Canada

The McMaster Muskoka Seminars are designed to provide clinicians (psychiatrists family doctors, other GP-Psychotherapists mental health professionals) with an outstanding opportunity to combine stimulating symposia with a relaxing summer vacation. This series of seminars is hosted by the Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, in conjunction with St. Joseph’s Healthcare, Hamilton and with the assistance and involvement of the OMA Section on General Practice Psychotherapy.

• The 2013 seminars will be held at the beautiful Deerhurst Resort in Huntsville, Ontario.

• Our week-long seminars run Monday to Friday from 9:00 – 12:15 daily, allowing registrants to make use of the resort amenities in the afternoons.

• The Courses offered will be held in July and August 2013. See below for exact dates.

9th Canadian Conference on Dementia


DATE:             November 2-4, 2017

LOCATION:   Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION: 
Phone: 416-597-3422 ext. 3448
Email: 
conferences@uhn.ca  

Website: www.canadianconferenceondementia.com

Call for abstracts: https://events.decorporate.ca/ccd2017/abstract/login.php

 

HIGHLIGHTS:

The Canadian Conference on Dementia (CCD) is a biennial national conference dedicated to advance knowledge on dementia in scientific research and clinical care.  Over 2 and half days participants will engage with eminent researchers and renowned scholars on cutting edge topics in dementia. The 9th CCD will focus on the theme of prevention and will offer interactive discussions, workshops, plenary sessions (including a lively debate), exhibitors, poster abstracts, entertainment, receptions and a gala dinner and dance!

 

REGISTRATION AND CALL FOR ABSTRACTS OPEN!

 

EVENT:          9th Canadian Conference on Dementia

DATE:             November 2-4, 2017

LOCATION:   Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION: 
Phone: 416-597-3422 ext. 3448
Email: 
conferences@uhn.ca  

Website: www.canadianconferenceondementia.com

Call for abstracts: https://events.decorporate.ca/ccd2017/abstract/login.php

 

HIGHLIGHTS:

The Canadian Conference on Dementia (CCD) is a biennial national conference dedicated to advance knowledge on dementia in scientific research and clinical care.  Over 2 and half days participants will engage with eminent researchers and renowned scholars on cutting edge topics in dementia. The 9th CCD will focus on the theme of prevention and will offer interactive discussions, workshops, plenary sessions (including a lively debate), exhibitors, poster abstracts, entertainment, receptions and a gala dinner and dance!

The 7th Canadian Conference on Dementia will be held in the beautiful city of Vancouver, British Columbia, Oct. 3-5, 2013. The 7th CCD organizing committee has put together an exciting program that has attracted a world renowned faculty of national and international speakers, featuring plenary and parallel sessions, a stimulating debate, interactive workshops as well as oral and poster research presentations.

In addition to an exceptional learning experience, the 7th CCD provides many opportunities for networking.

Vote in Round 6 of the Stars in Global Health program, until 15th November 2013.

Sort the videos by "Health Priority" and choose "Global Mental Health"

or click this link

All videos are two minutes or less. Anyone can watch the videos. Everyone can vote.

If you want to make comments then you must register and be logged in.

Videos are available for viewing until 1pm EST November 15, 2013.

Low-income countries hurt by natural disasters, HIV, wars, or civic strife are integrating mental health services into their general health care. They are even including proven forms of psychotherapy as part of the treatment provided in primary care settings, including in communities with very low resources (Patel et al., 2013; Eaton et al., 2012).

While The Affordable Health Act in the United States stands to increase the number of people who will receive mental health services in general health care and requires that mental health be on a par with medical care, psychotherapy may not be part of the services patients receive because of its diminishing role in the United States.

The increased use of psychotherapy in low-income countries has been based on evidence for its effectiveness for depression, the most prevalent of the mental conditions and one that produces great emotional and economic burden. A review of clinical trials of psychotherapy in countries with profound humanitarian crises found that psychotherapy worked! It produced better outcomes than usual care or in those on a waiting list -- often used as control groups in public health studies (Tol et al., 2011).

Psychotherapy in high-income countries has also recently received attention in Nature(2013) where a report on 198 clinical trials, which included over 15,000 adults with depression, showed robust effects for several common forms of psychotherapy (Barth et al., 2013).

A glimpse of what is occurring in poorer countries.

A private foundation funded two clinical studies of psychotherapy for the treatment of depression in Uganda. Psychotherapy reduced depression and its beneficial effects were sustained (Bolton et al., 2003). A clinical trial is now underway in Goa, India, to treat depression in primary care using brief psychotherapy (Patel et al., 2010; Miller, 2012). The Canadian government recently gave a $1 million grant to train health workers in psychotherapy in Ethiopia (Ravitz, personal communications, 2012) (https://www.mshfoundation.ca/page.aspx?pid=1822).

Health workers in primary care in Haiti are being trained to deliver brief psychotherapy in areas hit by the earthquake (Verdeli, personal communications, 2013). Physicians and other health and mental health professionals are being trained in psychotherapy in Brazil and in Congo for women and children who have been sexually abused (Mello, personal communications, 2012).

Supported by The World Health Organization (WHO), mental health professionals in Jordan are being trained in evidence based psychotherapy to provide services in primary care (Verdeli, personal communications, 2013). A clinical trial of psychotherapy by community health workers for depressed pregnant mothers was carried out in rural Pakistan and showed a reduction in mother's symptoms at six months, improvement that was sustained at one year (Rahman et al., 2008). A study of psychotherapy for patients with repeated primary care consultations for medically unexplained symptoms in general medical clinics in Sri Lanka was found to be effective in reducing symptoms of distress and number of visits (Sumathipala et al., 2000). These are all remarkable findings.

click the link to read the full article...

Focusing on Re-offense, Seclusion, Addiction, relationship between mental illness & criminal behaviour, substance abuse, psychotic & personality disorders in the context of Public safety, Social justice, Mental Health courts & community support.